Tag Archives: Msci

Lucy’s Third Year Blog

Well hello again, and hello for the final time!

I’m very sad to say that this is my last blog; so much has happened this year and it’s absolutely flown by! Despite all the horror stories that you hear about the stress of third year, it’s actually been my favourite yet, for both my course and for my life in Manchester. I’ve met so many great new people since September, and I’m absolutely gutted that most of them will be graduating and leaving Manchester in a couple of months. Not me though – I’m sticking around for my Masters project!

The last ever night together with the senior ambassador family, featuring our beloved Professor Liz Sheffield

The last ever night together with the senior ambassador family, featuring our beloved Professor Liz Sheffield

I’ve spent a big portion of this year carefully planning my big research project, so it’s crazy to think that I’ll actually be starting it in just a few months. I’ve settled on one of the two projects that I planned (not an easy choice when you really want to do both); I’ll be looking at “the effect of interleukin 27 on the metabolic profile of CD4+ T cells during Plasmodium yoelii infection”. Sound exciting? No? It sounds pretty awful actually doesn’t it? Let me explain.

A T cell-fie with my favourite immune cell

A T cell-fie with my favourite immune cell

In simple terms, I’m going to try to find out how one of the many signalling molecules in your immune system (IL-27) controls your immune response against malaria infection (caused by Plasmodium parasites). We know that this signalling molecule can down regulate the aggressive immune response (involving T cells) that your body mounts against malaria, but we don’t know how it does it. Everyone has heard of how devastating and deadly malaria is, yet the fatal damage caused by malaria is actually due to the way your immune system responds to the parasite. When infected with the malaria parasite, your body must mount an aggressive inflammatory response in order to clear the parasite from your blood. However, if this response is not switched off, it can cause fatal self-harm to your own tissues. If we can try to work out how the body can switch off this response, we might be able to better treat malaria in the future, reducing the associated mortality and morbidity caused by it. Sound better? I hope so! I cannot wait to get going with my project and spend a whole year carrying out in-depth and worthwhile research, focussing on something that I’m fascinated by. If parasites aren’t your thing, don’t worry; the faculty has hundreds of different labs working on pretty much any field of Biology you can think of, and with the MSci programme, you can choose which of these you’d like to work in!

In my last blog I told you about the MSci Experimental Skills Module. This was a really intense month of lab and field work as part of a small group, followed by a lab report, a group scientific poster and a poster presentation. I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t stressful. It was a lot of work in a very short space of time and we were working right up until exams, but it gave us a great chance to develop our essential research skills for next year. I’ve received some really positive and encouraging feedback on my work, so at least it was all worth it! I even managed to talk about microscopic nematodes (I swear I can relate ANYTHING to parasitology). Have a look at my previous blog if you’d like to know more about the project.

My last piece of coursework for third year featuring one of my many thousands of microscopic nematodes!

My last piece of coursework for third year featuring one of my many thousands of microscopic nematodes!

Right now though, I’m writing this blog to distract myself from the fact I’m halfway through my 5 essay and problem-based exams! I really like the units that I’ve chosen this year, so I’m at least finding the revision interesting. Nevertheless, I think we can all agree that exams are horrible. Although, I can find some solace in the fact that these are my LAST EVER EXAMS! Even though I have one year left at university, my fourth and final year just involves an enormous write up at the end, but no exams. I sat my first two exams this week and I think they went okay. By the time this has been posted, I’ll have finished my exams; now that’s a beautiful thought. If you have any exams at the moment, I wish you the best of luck! Don’t stress too much – it’ll be over before you know it!

I might have had 4 coursework deadlines and 5 exams in the past 6 weeks, but don’t think for one second that that’s stopped me from having fun! Oh no, we can’t have that! This month I jumped out of a plane with my housemate, raising over £1000 for charity – and I didn’t die! Sadly, I didn’t manage to get any action shots with my face flapping around as I plummeted towards the earth. I’d rather you didn’t see that anyway. I’ve also recently been to two music gigs in Manchester, one at the Manchester Academy at the Students’ Union to watch Kygo, and one at the Manchester Arena to see Busted (yes, I’m a loser but my 9 year old self just couldn’t pass on the opportunity); both were amazing! I’ve had a couple of BBQs; one with the senior ambassador and admissions team at Professor Liz Sheffield’s house, and the second in 28 degree heat with my housemates, my best friend, and her puppy (yes, 28 degrees in Manchester).

Not to mention, there’s plenty going on after exams. All of the final/third years sit the same final exam, so we all finish together. It’s a morning exam so we’ve decided to head into town afterwards and have a big brunch with lots of prosecco, then we’re heading to my friend’s to carry on the celebrations, and then back into town again. We’re definitely going to need it! The week after that we have the Life Sciences ball at the Midland Hotel; it’s themed “The Oscar’s”, so I’ve bought a ridiculously extravagant dress for it. Then, the day after that it’s Pangea, a huge festival held at the Students’ Union at the end of each semester, which is attended by thousands. Every Pangaea has a different fancy dress theme; the theme this time in “Carnival”, so I’ll be spending lots of time in the run up covered in glue, sequins and feathers whilst I try to make myself an outfit that the girls of Rio de Janeiro would be proud of. Although, I’ll probably end up looking more like a sparkly peacock that’s been in a fight. The week after that I’ll be jetting off to Barcelona for even more fun with my oldest course friends. Exams don’t seem quite so bad when you’ve got all that to look forward to.

Well, that’s about all I have for you this time. Thank you to my loyal readers for taking the time to hear about my life this year (that’s if I even have any loyal readers?! I don’t know). I hope you’ve enjoyed my ramblings! Writing this blog has really made me realise more than ever just how amazing both the city of Manchester, and the University’s Faculty of Life Sciences are. I’m so proud to be a student here, and I can’t wait to see what my final year brings.

Ciao for now,

Lucy

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Lucy’s Third Year Blog

Well hello again,

You find me at one of the busiest and most hectic times of any undergraduate degree: the final stretch of third year. Most third years are currently finishing off their final year project before exams start. As an MSci student though, as ever, things are quite a bit different. The usual 40 credits you get for your literature review and final year project are replaced by three different modules on the MSci course, all of which equip you for your final year as a research student, and beyond.

The first was a 10 credit bioinformatics module which we completed in first semester, which turned out to be much less daunting than I’d expected – I actually did really well in it. The second is a 10 credit project proposal module which is stretched out across the whole year. For this, you have to complete quite a bit of work during the first week back after summer, then compose two different research project proposals (one per semester), one of which will become your final year MSci project. This unit has probably been mt favourite MSci unit, as you have total freedom to work with any of the researchers in the faculty and pursue a project in pretty much anything you can imagine. However, this freedom also comes with a lot of responsibility; you must organise the projects and find two supervisors to work with yourself, and carry out most of the work independently (with a little help from your supervisors, of course).

Finally, we also have a 20 credit experimental skills module. This is a really intense unit, condensed into just 4 weeks. You have to design an individual project, which is part of a wider group research project. My group are carrying out a baseline ecological survey of the green spaces on the university campus, and comparing the biodiversity of that to a local, poorly-maintained park in a residential area behind the university. This project is part of the university’s commitment to social responsibility and working with local communities. The data we produce will be submitted to Manchester City Council and used to inform the planning of the regeneration of the local park, and of the redevelopment and pedestrianisation of Brunswick Street on the university campus, to expand our green spaces. It’s quite exciting knowing that the data we collect will be put to good use. However, there’s a lot of work to be done in a relatively short space of time. This week has been spent doing site visits, and planning the project. We had to write and submit a 2 page experimental design, then we will begin collecting data.

Survey site

Survey site on campus

I have about 9 days to collect around 50 soil samples from the two field sites, and analyse them in the lab. I’ll be looking at the different properties of the soil, such as: pH, moisture content, the presence of calcium carbonate. Then, I’ll be sieving and centrifuging the soil to separate the microscopic nematodes from within it, to measure the nematode abundance. I chose to look at nematodes because – if you’ve read my other blogs – you’ll know I have a thing for parasites, especially wormy ones! Even though these are free-living nematodes, I couldn’t help but make the tenuous link to parasitism. Anyway, once that’s all done I have to statistically analyse my data and write a 5 page lab report. Then, our group will get together to compile all of our data and collectively produce a professional (looking) A1 poster representing our results. This will then be at the centre of a 15 minute group presentation, in which we will all have to answer questions on the project. Sound like a lot? Yep. Oh, and that’s not even considering exams, which start about a week after all this finishes. Ahhh the life of a third year. It’s a good job I love what I do!

So I guess you’d think that – with all that work – I’ve become a solitary creature, found only in the darkest depths of the library. For the most part, you’d be right. However, I like to make sure I reward myself with a bit of fun. This week brought another Tuesday night at Bongo’s bingo at Albert hall (see my last blog if you’re wondering why on earth a 21 year old student would go to bingo), a night at the Albert’s Schloss bar with a live band, and a summertime themed house party for a friends birthday. I also took my sister to the Manchester Opera House to watch Chicago. It was such a good show and I even got the tickets on a cheap student deal. So I’ve had plenty of chance to blow off some steam.

I’ve also been working hard at fundraising for charity for the past few weeks. My housemate and I both have both volunteered abroad with two sister international development charities; which aim to improve access to clean drinking water, promote gender equality and increase environmental sustainability. We both had such incredible experiences, so we decided to fundraise to help fund future projects. I don’t know how I ended up agreeing to this, but we are doing a sponsored sky dive this week; I am beyond petrified. Amazingly, we’ve already raised nearly £700, so at least my untimely death will be for a worthwhile cause. Anyway, I can’t think about jumping out of a plane right now, so I’m changing the subject to something less traumatic.

Fundraiser by day, hula girl by night.

Fundraiser by day, hula girl by night.

In fact, I’m going to talk about something quite the opposite of traumatic…PUPPIES! Well, singular – just the one puppy. My best friend from back home graduated from university last summer and is now living and working in Manchester, not too far away from me. She rang me last month and told me she was getting a puppy! I’m probably the most excitable dog lover you’ll ever meet. I’m the weirdo who will go round to someone’s house and sit on the floor spooning their dog, rather than actually spend any time with them. So naturally, I was straight around to her house to meet the little pup! Last week we took her for her very first walk around the reservoir in Manchester and she absolutely loved it! Walks and puppy cuddles are the best form of stress relief from uni work I could ask for; oh, and it’s nice to see my best friend too!

"Arghh I have so many deadlin...aww look at the puppy! Let's go for a walk"

“Arghh I have so many deadlin…aww look at the puppy! Let’s go for a walk.”

The next six or seven weeks will be a whirlwind of excitement and stress which will see me through to the end of third year (well that’s a terrifying thought). It will bring with it: 4 coursework deadlines, 5 exams, 2 music gigs, 1 BBQ (hopefully – it is Manchester), 1 end of year ball and 1 trip to Barcelona! If you’ve read my other blogs, you’ll remember that I booked holiday to Barcelona during Easter with some of my course friends to visit our friend who’s out there working in a zoology lab for his modern language year. Well things didn’t really go to plan; we went to the airport, got through security and were called to board the plane, but alas, our flight was suddenly cancelled due to the French air traffic control strikes. The next available flight was the day after we were supposed to return home. So we lost our entire holiday. They even made us show our boarding cards to go downstairs to arrivals, and then made us go through immigration because we’d “technically left the country”. Suffice to say, it was a pretty depressing train ride back to Fallowfield. We were absolutely gutted; a few days in the Spanish sun was just what we needed. However, we’ve just been refunded for the flights and now we’ve rebooked to go straight after final exams instead! I’m sure we’ll need the break even more by then, and it will be twice as hot. Silver linings and all that eh? Anyway, that’s enough blabbering from me; as usual, I should be doing my work.

Ciao for now,

Lucy

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Lucy’s Third Year Blog

Hello again!

I can’t believe it’s time for me to write another blog already – the months are just flying by. Last time I was writing I’d just finished my exams and now I already have my results! Overall I’m really happy and now I just need to keep my foot on the pedal for a few more months until summer. So what have I been up to since then? All sorts really! With third year, two jobs and a social life, I feel like one of those circus acts that runs back and forth keeping 10 plates spinning at once. I absolutely love everything I do though and I’m just glad I can make the most of Manchester whilst I’m still here!

Things are starting to get busier at university now we’re well into second semester. Things haven’t become too crazy yet but I think most of Easter will be spent pouring out my essays and second project proposal. Soon I’ll be starting my MSci experimental skills module. I’m not too sure what to expect from it as it’s the first time it’s run. It looks like we’re going to spend around 30 hours in the lab or field doing a group experiment that we have planned between us, followed by a group presentation of our mini-project with a professional scientific poster that that we have put together, as well as an individual lab report. It’s going to be an intense four weeks whilst we get everything together but the unit will aim to replicate the sort of situation you’d be working in within a real lab. For this, collaboration and team work is key so the unit will be really useful for developing these skills. I’m really enjoying my current units (which have nearly finished already) and this is probably my favourite semester of my degree so far.

Whilst my deadlines seem to be fairly far away (further than they actually are), I’ve been getting some hours in at work. I found it really easy to get a part-time job around the corner from my house in Fallowfield and it’s a great way to top up my bank account between student loans. In my other job as a senior ambassador uniform the Faculty of Life Sciences, I work with really great team and we’ve all become close friends over the past year or two. It really is the best job I’ve ever had. We’re starting to near the end of the UCAS interview days for this academic year and therefore our work as ambassadors is also rounding off; upon realisation of this upsetting fact, we’ve decided to start having lots of socials. For the past few weeks after the interviews and tours on Wednesdays we’ve been heading to the Students’ Union for cheap food and a few games of pool to savour our remaining time together. I’m currently arranging a social for the final interview day; trying to book a meal for 60 people is a little tricky but I think I’ve found somewhere. The curry mile is pretty good for catering for large groups and there are so many restaurants you can go to.

However, our social this week was really quite something to behold. The social of all socials. It was genuinely the best night out I’ve ever had and I don’t think it can ever be beaten. We went to an event called “Bongo’s Bingo ft. The Vengaboys” at the Albert Hall. Yes, this is exactly what it sounds like. I felt like I’d died and gone to 90s kids’ heaven. Around 30 of the ambassadors got together and went to the Albert Hall, where we had a few drinks, played bingo (for both hilariously terrible and cash prizes), danced around with hundreds of people to The Vengaboys live. One of the ambassador’s housemates even won the jackpot of £1000. It was like one of those surreal dreams you have, where a series of random things all happen at once – except it was real – and it was brilliant.

Hover over photos to read captions:

Anyway, back to reality now. Everything is starting to get a little easier now that the days are getting a little longer and brighter again, or at least that’s what I thought. One day last week I woke up, opened my curtains and was greeted with snow (in MARCH)! At first, the little girl within me started jumping up and down with excitement ready to launch a snowball at my housemates, until the grumpy old lady within me told her to calm down and reminded her that she had to somehow walk to work in an hour. As fun, magical and exciting as snow is, I’m slightly terrified of having to actually go anywhere in it, for fear of slipping and falling over in a puddle of slush and breaking a bone. Now if you’re reading this from somewhere classically snowy like Scandinavia, or maybe Canada, you’ll be laughing at how pathetic and dramatic that sounds. If you’re reading this from England you’ll probably be nodding your head in agreement when I say: the English cannot deal with snow, or any remotely unusual weather patterns for that matter. The snow we get here is pretty infrequent and light, but quickly turns to an ice rink. Nonetheless, I subdued the grumpy old lady within and went for a play in the snow. For those of you wondering, I made it to work alive and in one piece, even if I did practically have to inadvertently ice skate there.

blog snow

Fallowfield or Narnia? Definitely Narnia – I am Lucy after all.

Right around now a lot of you will be nearing the end of your A Levels and getting ready to make one of the biggest decisions of your life: what university to go to. Maybe you’ve already decided where to go (*cough* Manchester *cough*), but if you’re wondering why you should choose Manchester, here’s just a few reasons why I picked the great capital of the North and why it’s one of the best decisions I’ve ever made! First of all, I’m a Northern girl myself; I come from Blackpool and having lived in the North for most of my life, I just can’t believe how much more you can get for your money around here. That certainly goes a long way when it comes to paying for day-to-day essentials like food and rent. However, that only narrowed it down to the north of England. So why Manchester?

The field courses are one of the top reasons. The faculty has an incredible range of field courses available and the second year Costa Rica trip really appealed to me. It was a really unique opportunity to carry out my own tropical field research and we even got exclusive access to visit the Costa Rican Amphibian Research Centre due to contacts made by the university staff, as well as having a day off white water rafting on one of the best rafting rivers in the world. It also gave me a great excuse to travel around afterwards and I made some lifelong friends with people I barely even knew before the trip.

blog field course

You’ve got to get 10 credits somehow

The Manchester’s Faculty of Life Sciences is also much more heavily focussed on research than other universities, so the people teaching you are the very people who are making the discoveries in the lab that are hitting the headlines or rewriting the textbooks. This also means you have to opportunity to work with some incredible academics who are leaders in their respective fields; who despite their busy schedules, are extremely approachable and friendly, and always willing to help. This is especially important for me as an MSci student as I can collaborate with scientists within the faculty for my masters project, who are researching and teaching topics which I’m most excited about. With literally hundreds of labs working in different fields from cancer to algae and cardiology to parasites, there is sure to be someone in the Faculty researching an area of interest which you can get involved with for either the MSci course, final year projects, or even just for a summer internship.

Finally, there is just SO much to do in Manchester. Even after three years I’m still finding new places or events that I never even knew existed. There really is something for everyone here and can honestly say I have never been bored since moving to Manchester. I could go on forever about how much I love the place but I don’t have the space, so you’ll just have to come here and find out for yourself instead!

Ciao for now,

Lucy

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Lucy’s Third Year Blog

Hello again,

Exams are finally over and I honestly couldn’t be happier. Things get pretty intense in third year and the exams are harder than ever before. Luckily I really enjoy the units I’ve chosen this year and I’m getting stuck into the topics that I’m most interested in. I spent pretty much the whole of January revising, so my life has been a little uneventful since my last post. I sat three exams in total: ‘Advanced Immunology’, ‘The Evolution of Genes, Genomes and Systems’ and ‘Biotic Interactions’. Generally, I feel happy about the questions that came up, so hopefully it will all be worth it (I get my results in a month or so).  If you sat any exams in the past month I hope they went well for you! In the meantime, I’m spending some time recovering from the intense few weeks I’ve just had.

Just one glass for me!

Just one glass for me!

I finished my last exam about a week ago on the same day as my other housemates. The possibilities were endless; I’d forgotten what freedom was like! What to do first?! Eat? Sleep? Drink? Go out? My housemates and I made plans to go to the Northern Quarter to watch a free live jazz band at a cocktail bar.  However, being the unorganised and slightly exhausted people we were, we didn’t even manage to get ourselves ready until around 11pm. Nevertheless, we had a great night and ended up ordering food and having drinks at the house – it was lovely!

I didn’t get to see very much of my family over Christmas since I was so engrossed in my revision, so last weekend I went home for a surprise visit. It was so lovely to see everyone and we went out for a much needed Sunday lunch at the pub! This isn’t just any pub though, they serve the most spectacular cakes you can imagine and I brought a couple of slices back to Manchester with me. I have a soft spot for cake and so to not miss out on delicious deserts whilst I’m in Manchester, I’ve sniffed out another amazing cake shop in the Northern Quarter where they are possibly even tastier than the ones at home. Funnily enough, it’s actually called ‘Home Sweet Home’!

I love cake!

I love cake!

Yesterday I met up with my best friend after a long month apart. I know her from school back home but she lives in Manchester too now. Despite the rather windy weather we decided to go somewhere for a walk. We’re both used to living by the beach where we can go walking, and although Manchester has pretty much everything you could ever need, it doesn’t have a beach (we’ll let it off). However, we took a short drive to the edge of Manchester where we found a beautiful reservoir surrounded by hills. It was surprisingly close to the city yet it felt like we were a million miles away from anywhere or anyone. I love living in Manchester for so many reasons but one of the best reasons is that, if I ever want to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city, there are so many parks and pretty places to discover nearby.

Exploring the other side of Manchester

Exploring the other side of Manchester

Brushing up on Malaria pathology (with cake - or course!)

Brushing up on Malaria pathology (with cake – of course!)

I don’t have any lectures this week as final year students now get a week between exams and semester 2 to get a head start on their final year projects. Luckily I’m not a final year, so this week is a pretty chilled one for me. I am however getting stuck into my next Masters project proposal. You might remember me saying last semester that I had to design two research projects for my fourth year, one of which I would pursue as my masters project. I really enjoyed my last one where I designed a project which looked at the immune response to whipworm in the intestine. My research on this even came in handy as extra reading during exams! My second project proposal is going to stick with the theme of parasites and is focussed on the pathology of malaria. I really don’t know in any detail what I’m going to do yet but I have my first meeting with my supervisor this week to discuss possibilities. I’m really excited about this one as malaria is a disease that I’m fascinated by and that is really close to my heart. The MSci programme has given me the freedom to pursue my interest in parasitology and self-arrange two projects that I’m really passionate about. In fact, I’m going to find it very hard to pick just one at the end of this year.

It’s great to have this week off uni, but I’m actually very excited for my lecture units this semester! I’ll be taking ‘Bioethics’ which I think will be a really nice change from what I’m used to as it’s very interactive and we’ll be debating lots of controversial topics based on science and biomedicine. I’m also taking ‘Immune Response and Disease’ along with ‘Advanced Parasitology’. I will definitely be in my element with parasitology!

This week I’ve spoiled myself a little. I have booked to go to Barcelona with some of my course friends in the Easter break to visit another one of our Biology friends who is currently living there as part of his industrial/modern language year. He sounds like he’s having an amazing time out there working in a zoology lab and we couldn’t pass on the perfect excuse for a quick getaway. I’ve also booked to go to Brussels a couple of weeks after that with some other friends from home. I’m quite a savvy traveller so it’s all worked out pretty cheap (for what it is), although I need to stop booking flights willy-nilly and actually try to save some of my money  for once.

I’m getting very excited for the rest of this year; it’s already shaping up to be a good one! Hopefully I’ll have even more to tell you next time!

Ciao for now!

Lucy

 

 

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Lucy’s third year blog

Hello there!

I’m Lucy and I’m here to tell you about life as a third year on one of the brand spanking new Masters of Science (MSci) programmes in the Faculty of Life Sciences (FLS). I’ll be updating you throughout the year as I venture into the uncharted territory of project proposals and bioinformatics as one of the first ever MSci students. I’ll also be telling you a bit about my (hopefully slightly interesting) life as a student as we go.

First, let me tell you a bit about myself. I moved to Manchester at the age of 19 from the not so glamorous or sunny seaside town of Blackpool. Now, a couple of years on, I’ve somehow made it through to third year and I’ve completely fallen in love with Manchester. I decided I couldn’t bear to leave at the end of this year, so I’m staying for a masters!

I was lucky enough to spend most of my summer travelling this year. It all started off with an FLS field course to Costa Rica, where I conducted my own research on tropical frogs and toads. Following the field course, I and a few of my course friends stayed behind for some adventures of our own involving zip lines, horses, volcanic mud baths, diving and a 3 day pit stop in New York on the way home! The trip gave me the fondest and funniest memories that I’ll be blabbering about for years to come, as well as lots of very “Gap yah” photos! I celebrated my 21st birthday at home with my family and squeezed in as many hours at work as possible, then continued on to London, Greece and Paris.

costa rica

The hard life of a Biology student

After a whirlwind summer of excitement and mayhem (which left me with a very sad looking bank account), I’m more than ready to be settling back into a routine at uni. I’m now living in a cosy house with 3 flatmates from first year and our new pet goldfish, Rhubarb. This has quite frankly been a welcome change from the madness of living in an enormous 8 bedroom party house last year. It was so much fun, but it’s time to knuckle down.

Over the years, we’ve discovered some of the unique little gems that Manchester has to offer. One of these is the Hallé Orchestra at the Bridgewater Hall. I’ve never been much of classical music fan, but the Hallé puts on an incredible show every week and as a student you can get tickets for just £3! It’s really worth giving it a go if you fancy something different and it’s unbelievably cheap!

halle

Pretending to be an adult at the Orchestra #21goingon51

Right about now is my favourite time of year to be in Manchester. There is SO much going on. Warehouse Project is back in full swing until New Year, the Christmas market cabins are popping up in town and last week it was Bonfire night. Platt Fields Park (right across the road from the UoM accommodation) hosts a free fireworks display, bonfire and funfair each year. It’s always a great night! As for the Christmas markets, they’ve just open so I will be there faster than you can say ‘hog roast’, ready to spend more money that I don’t have on delicious food that I don’t need. I’m sure my next blog post will include a picture of me looking very merry indeed with some mulled wine at the markets – YAY!

Now we’re halfway through the semester, so you’ll find me buried under an ever growing pile of work! I’m in the process of planning the first of two research project proposals for my masters, one of which will become my final year project. Both will be based in the field of parasitology (I have a thing for parasites – don’t ask!). The one I’m currently working on will be looking at the immune response against whipworm, a disease which affects many people in developing countries. It’s going to be a lot of work but I’m really excited to finally have the freedom to design a project that is my own and on something I’m really passionate about. Speaking of my project proposal, I really better get on with it as I’m miles behind (shhh – don’t tell my supervisor).

Ciao for now!

Lucy

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